The Music of Love

Just the other week, there was an article that pointed to a study making the claim that listening to romantic music (love songs) increases a person’s predisposition to entertain romantic thoughts and accept romantic advances.

I don’t find the idea all that outlandish. In fact, it makes plenty of good sense to me.

Now there are two things I want to know from you:

  1. What do you think of the assertion made in the study?
  2. What music gets you “in the mood”?

Talk to me people, I’ve been away from this blog for the better part of a month now, help me dust it off.

  • Christie Chapman

    I think it makes sense that love songs might make us more susceptible to falling in love. This idea makes me think of a part in my favorite novel, “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” by Milan Kundera: “Tomas did not realize at the time that metaphors are dangerous. Metaphors are not to be trifled with. A single metaphor can give birth to love.”

    People shape their own worlds, and they often do so in a way that makes their lives beautiful, or at least meaningful. Growing up, we’re fed movies and TV shows and books and songs and music videos that teach us how love is supposed to look and feel. We watch a movie and we see a montage of characters falling in love; the montage is set to stirring music that might have romantic lyrics. We link the love with the love song in our minds. Then in real life sometimes, when we’re with someone we could possibly fall for — if just the right song comes on, it can crystallize the moment in our minds and make it a cherished memory, a moment we return to again and again to reinforce our feelings of love for the person.

    I realize I’m saying a lot of “duh” stuff here, but it amazes me how I can *know* all of this social conditioning is working on me — yet it still works on me.

    I’m a rational sort of person, but I’ll admit that it disheartens me to boil something like love down to chemical reactions in the brain or social conditioning. So I’ll also say that maybe love songs tap into something universal, striking a chord in us. A beautiful or passionate song starts to play, we look into someone’s eyes or move our body with someone else’s on the dancefloor… and magic happens. I’m rational but I believe in some kinds of magic.

  • Christie Chapman

    I think it makes sense that love songs might make us more susceptible to falling in love. This idea makes me think of a part in my favorite novel, “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” by Milan Kundera: “Tomas did not realize at the time that metaphors are dangerous. Metaphors are not to be trifled with. A single metaphor can give birth to love.”

    People shape their own worlds, and they often do so in a way that makes their lives beautiful, or at least meaningful. Growing up, we’re fed movies and TV shows and books and songs and music videos that teach us how love is supposed to look and feel. We watch a movie and we see a montage of characters falling in love; the montage is set to stirring music that might have romantic lyrics. We link the love with the love song in our minds. Then in real life sometimes, when we’re with someone we could possibly fall for — if just the right song comes on, it can crystallize the moment in our minds and make it a cherished memory, a moment we return to again and again to reinforce our feelings of love for the person.

    I realize I’m saying a lot of “duh” stuff here, but it amazes me how I can *know* all of this social conditioning is working on me — yet it still works on me.

    I’m a rational sort of person, but I’ll admit that it disheartens me to boil something like love down to chemical reactions in the brain or social conditioning. So I’ll also say that maybe love songs tap into something universal, striking a chord in us. A beautiful or passionate song starts to play, we look into someone’s eyes or move our body with someone else’s on the dancefloor… and magic happens. I’m rational but I believe in some kinds of magic.

  • Janis

    I have to wonder how much of “the love of my life” relationship had to do with the music that was constantly on in the background…

  • Janis

    I have to wonder how much of “the love of my life” relationship had to do with the music that was constantly on in the background…

  • luzviminda policarpio

    since i was a child i’ve been a music lover…there are times that i would changed the lyrics..or mix something..results seem to be funny…at a younger age i also remember my mom would sing a lovesong to my dad..whenever they are having arguments…but it was thru a lovesong she would sing.. i made a mistake of loving you..then my father would stop..and become silent… love song is a part of our everyday living..make us smile…laugh..mad…i think it plays an important role..if you are a music lover you don’t grow old…music is a part of me…i’ll die without it….

  • since i was a child i’ve been a music lover…there are times that i would changed the lyrics..or mix something..results seem to be funny…at a younger age i also remember my mom would sing a lovesong to my dad..whenever they are having arguments…but it was thru a lovesong she would sing.. i made a mistake of loving you..then my father would stop..and become silent… love song is a part of our everyday living..make us smile…laugh..mad…i think it plays an important role..if you are a music lover you don’t grow old…music is a part of me…i’ll die without it….

Get Adobe Flash player